Pusha T discusses “Mr. Morale & The Big Steppers” by Kendrick Lamar, the Clipse reunion, and the album he’d compare “It’s Almost Dry” to in the ongoing Rap Album Of The Year campaign.
With every solo performance, the stakes are always high when you’re Pusha T. The founder of G.O.O.D. Music clearly thrives under pressure. The rapper debuted in 2017 with his masterpiece, Daytona, a seven-song album entirely produced by Kanye West that unreasonably raised the bar for everything else that came out of the Wyoming sessions. The immediate claim that it was a classic has, in a remarkably rare case, stood the test of time.

Kanye West and Pharrell collaborated on the production of 14 songs for It’s Almost Dry. These eerie, manic laughs from Pusha T are brought out by Skateboard P and spread throughout the album. These subtleties contribute to the song structure’s layers, which is Pharrell’s main goal. Kanye West, meanwhile, gives Pusha T the freedom to return to the fundamentals of lyrics and beats. Together, they enhanced Push’s strengths and produced a strong contender for Rap Album of the Year.

The label includes an image. James Pereira, with thanks
He continues, “I felt like having them split it half and half would kind of reflect the contrasts in them as producers, as well as the differences in what they enjoy from me, artistically and as a writer. It was a demonstration of each person’s taste level and interests with regard to me.

The outcomes were conclusive. The album received immediate acclaim from both reviewers and listeners, earning Pusha T his first #1 on the Billboard 200. It’s Almost Dry and its predecessor share the luxury of time that he was given to create both, even while Daytona may not have achieved those same chart-topping heights. He tells us to “be glad” when he drops.

I’ve been honest. When I drop, I just want it. I drop when I drop. I desire what is mine. They are free to release five albums per year for the rest of their career and have all the other years. It’s alright. The rap album of the year, though, is what I want when I drop. Regarding his rivals for Rap Album of the Year, he says, “And it’s okay.

Early in June, we spoke with Pusha T on Kendrick Lamar, the Clipse’s reunion, Rap Album of the Year, and the importance of a Grammy to his successful career.

Putu T: Man, you know, I can’t compare it to the actual record since I can’t find it. It’s weird, Pharrell and I were just talking about it the other day, so I know I kind of fell short of my own expectations. This would have been my Vol. 2 if I had released a global single, such as, say, “Hard Knock Life.” However, I don’t believe that music or the song that would tick that box was developed by us, therefore I can’t really say that it’s my Volume 2 or my Volume 2. It’s almost Hard Knock Life. However, I believe we may have missed a tune. He concurred with me, too. In that regard, he concurred with me. And for the upcoming project we are working on, we now have new targets on our dartboard.

One thing I observed is how much the East Coast has influenced this endeavour. The Clipse embodies that time period and has the sound of Virginia. I was curious about how you feel your solo albums depict the Bronx, where you were born.

I didn’t spend a lot of time in the Bronx. There, I was just born. I would say that Virginia had become a part of the New York to VA pipeline throughout the period in which I was raised in Virginia, particularly New York Hip Hop and basically the era of the street culture. My music undoubtedly reflects the refinement of the East coast. At the time, the Dirty South did not adopt Virginia, and this is still evident today. You see, from where I’m standing, my musical tastes are more East Coast than they are southern Atlantan.

Kanye and Pharrell collaborated equally on the production. How does this new album fit into your career as a solo artist on G.O.O.D. Music and as one-half of the Clipse?

People frequently enquire me how I handle the business of Kanye West and one of my lifelong best friends, Pharrell Williams, as well as how we managed to forge this brotherhood. And I thought that having them split it 50/50 would kind of reflect the differences between them as producers as well as the differences between what they enjoy about my work as an artist and a writer. And I believe it was pretty obvious, such as who or what Pharrell enjoys listening to. Each of their taste levels and what they are into when it comes to me were on display. It, in my opinion, resulted in a very complete, unified album. With Kanye West in charge, we heard Daytona. And now since they’re both contributing to It’s Almost Dry, I think it really makes for a terrific, well-rounded album where you get a lot of character in Pharell Williams’ production and a lot of the purest components of the sample-driven Kanye West. And it seems to be the ideal complement.

I was wondering if you could explain the sense that Madlib’s production provides you in comparison to both Ye and Pharell after working with two of the finest producers of our time.

I feel like I would be borrowing from a Madlib project and adding my own subtleties because Man, Madlib’s ear for simply unconventional sonics and samples is really, really great. I believe it plays into a different chamber that I haven’t explored since I haven’t worked with him in that way, but I think it would be really advantageous to the Pusha T brand and when it comes to that music. I feel like he simply has a very strange and unorthodox taste. That would definitely work out perfectly in my favour.

What are the secrets to remaining relevant in that arena while simultaneously rising beyond it for someone who is frequently supported by the streets?

I believe that the streets are constantly evolving and changing. And the easiest way to stay current is to just be aware of everything going on around you. The streets never seem to become monotonous or old to me. That is one aspect of hip hop that has never changed. The model for what will happen is whatever is popular on the streets right now. Everything significant to culture is dictated by the streets. It establishes trends. Just pay attention; the streets are always first. If you stay in touch with the streets, you may always speak at the peoples’ frequency, or at least at the frequency of a certain group of people, which will again work to your advantage.

“I believe that the streets are constantly evolving and changing. And the easiest way to stay current is to simply be aware of everything going on around you.”

The label includes an image. James Pereira, with thanks
In addition, I was curious about your opinions on Kendrick Lamar’s most recent album as part of your campaign for rap album of the year.

I believe Kendrick’s album… I believe his CD is excellent. His record, in my opinion, is undoubtedly a topic of discussion. I believe that Kendrick writes his songs the way he does. Man, it was outstanding, in my opinion. It certainly impressed me, in my opinion. I think the competition is fantastic. What you want to hear is all that matters. I believe that this is the best rap album of the year, given what I do and the goals I had in mind. It’s nearly dry. That describes the energy and the vibe. I believe I exude that kind of enthusiasm. I don’t believe Kendrick and I produced the same kind of album. There are two distinct listening.

“I believe his CD is excellent. His record, in my opinion, is undoubtedly a topic of discussion. I believe that Kendrick writes his songs the way he does. Man, it was outstanding, in my opinion.”
I believe that these two albums are among the most eagerly awaited of the year. Why do you think these albums are so crucial to the culture when you consider the current rap musical landscape?

mostly because we are the best rap artists. I’m simply referring to being fundamentally sound rappers, or like extremely good rappers [laughs]. You can trust those two artists to tell you the truth. All done. People are aware of the quality they are receiving. You are aware of your taste buds working. You are confident that you are receiving well-considered compositions. Again, your preferences are your preferences, but you can rely on the fact that nobody has expressed disdain for either my album or his album. You’ll undoubtedly enjoy both, in my opinion. It simply depends on how you are feeling and what frame of mind you choose to be in.

“You can trust those two artists to tell you the truth. All done. People are aware of the quality they are receiving. You are aware of your taste buds working. You are confident that you are receiving well-considered compositions.”
And which other albums do you believe should currently be considered contenders for the title of best rap album?

Who else quit? Inform me.

That is a valid query. Right now, I’m having trouble coming up with that.

Yes, let’s quit now. Let’s stop playing around. Stop it, please. Everything is clear to everyone. Brother, this is not rocket science. And remember to smile. I don’t drop annually. So, be ecstatic. You know what, it’s going to be his, say. And after that, we may have another year and a half, two years, or something else. In the absence of a change in pitch, but you know, I’ve been fair. I only want it when I drop what I’m dropping. I desire what is mine. They are free to release five albums per year for the rest of their career and have all the other years. It’s alright. The rap album of the year, though, is what I want when I drop. And it’s alright.

“I’ve been honest. I only want it when I drop what I’m dropping. I desire what is mine. They are free to release five albums per year for the rest of their career and have all the other years. It’s alright. The rap album of the year, though, is what I want when I drop. And it’s alright”
Regarding the Clipse reunion, I did want to inquire. I am aware that you dismissed the idea of it happening in 2020, but then these two records appeared. What has changed in the last two years that may possibly lead to a Clipse reunion, I was curious to know?

I just believe that there are numerous crucial circumstances. The Nigo initiative is crucial. I Know NIGO! is an album with the topic “just as friends and like, as far as the friendship, the history and as far as the actual album”! Nigo didn’t necessarily want to collaborate on songs with strangers, but it would be sacrilege to exclude the Clipse from that endeavour. That is yours. And on That’s Almost Dry, you basically have big brother-little brother interactions, so it seemed like a straightforward request to me. Nothing quite so significant actually occurred. It was really true information that made a tonne of sense, and I believe that my brother’s outstanding work has sparked discussions and the flames of “Oh no. Without a doubt, The Clipse might release a new album tomorrow.

The label includes an image. James Pereira, with thanks
Can we anticipate a new single from the Clipse for the summer? I just noticed that Pharrell is releasing the Clipse for Something In The Water.

Oh my God, I won’t say that. No. But here we are again with the “what kind of ask is that?” It’s a family question. It’s like, you know, Pharrell is there, Something In The Water is playing, and we are. We’re in Washington, DC, so why wouldn’t we show up and address the crowd? That is mostly directed at passengers who are transferring from a 757 to just, you know. For the Clipse and for myself as a soloist, it’s always been a pretty strong spot. Therefore, it’s beneficial to interact with the audience and once again mention our company’s history and tradition. These are unique times. But no, you won’t be receiving a single; that’s not what will happen. I wish so much.

Just released on streaming sites is exclusive audio footage. I was curious as to what memories you had when you heard about this initiative.

when things were simply the most enjoyable. the most imaginative eras. I thought… We were making music in such a casual environment with my nieces and nephews on songs. Everyone was in a very creative state at that time; everyone felt and had some degree of creative freedom. Anything would be tried. I recall doing anything and everything. We were unconcerned and unconcerned. Before attempting it five times, there was no notion that was shot down. And that carefreeness comes to mind as I reflect. Overthinking has occasionally caused it to get lost along the route. We didn’t have the tendency to overthink back then. We were young.

“Award shows the only way you bitches could rob me,” is one of my favourite quotes. How do you feel now that your work has been recognised by award shows?

I desire to be known. I come from a time when I had to go to separate ceremonies because I was nominated for a few Grammys and there was a time when I had to. The Grammys used to never be broadcast on television. We once abstained from watching the Grammys. And there was a period when rap, or at least what we would consider rap, wasn’t properly represented. And I believe the Grammy Awards have been particularly strong, especially when I was actually nominated. I thought that was a really accurate and good portrayal of the finalists and the winner, respectively. It’s encouraging to see things developing and moving forward in a positive way because it demonstrates how diverse rap is and how it’s possible to compete on both a popular and a niche level while also having a growing fan base. That, in my opinion, is evidence that they truly got it right. So yeah, I want awards. It’s all that I want. Everything I’m coming for, I want.